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Helen has taught Internationally since 1999. She is currently a visiting lecturer at Middlesex University. In 2011 she was a Guest Professor in Berlin for the project Greenlab at Kunsthochschule Weissensee for four months. She offers various classes from her studio in London. Below you can find a list of some of her recent teaching projects.

2013 Haystack School of Arts and Crafts

GOMA, Glasgow

Chelsea College of Art, CCW Graduate School

2012 University of Hertfordshire

Manchester Metropolitan University

2011 Guest Professor, Kunsthochschule Weissensee, Berlin

Sint Lucas, Antwerp: ‘Marking Place: understanding environment through journeys and collecting’  

California College of the Arts, San Francisco, USA   

2011and ongoing Middlesex University, London.

2010 and ongoing Camberwell College of Art and Design, London. MA Designer Maker

2010 Pratt Fine Arts, Seattle, USA

Strelka Post Graduate School for Architecture and Design, Moscow: QUICK and SLOW: Time is in your hands

Penland School of Arts, North Carolina, USA

Edinburgh College of Arts

2008 University of East Carolina, North Carolina, USA

2007 Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA

University of East Carolina, North Carolina, USA

Millersville University, Pennsylvania, USA

For more information and course prices or to register your interest email me at: helencarnac@yahoo.com

Images from Seattle where I led a Masterclass at the Pratt Fine Arts Center, Seattle, USA November 2010.

Previous Courses include:

2 week studio at Penland North Carolina, USA May/June 2010

‘The world is full of marks. They may be left accidentally or made with a purpose. We might see them or they might go unnoticed. Through photography, drawings, or found objects, we will collect a range of marks found in the Penland landscape. These will be used as the basis for an exploration of nontraditional enameling processes. Through a series of demonstrations and studio work, we will explore a range of techniques including mark making, drawing, sgrafitto, collage, and the appropriation of found materials.’

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